lazy noodles (kluski leniwe) with pesto

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I have been so lazy lately.  But seriously, I am not sure what is going on.  There are two possibilities I can fathom, allergies or the end of summer just makes us lazy.  I went to Chicago for a week and since returning it has been hard to want to cook or exercise or do anything productive.  I just want to take leisurely strolls through the park and read a book in the grass, drinking cappuccinos and eating bread.  Again, the city is even more empty the last two weeks of August and I love it so much but it is not helping my laziness.  Now it is September 1st and it’s chilly in the morning and evening, which is so refreshing!  Overall not a bad summer.

So lazy noodles is a thing in Polish cooking.  Who doesn’t love lazy cooking!  We need more recipes like this in life.  They are also sometimes called lazy pierogi or lazy kopitka (which means little hooves and is another dish that uses potato instead – but I guess the lazy way is like this with cheese).  I seemed like the best thing to make since I’m lazy, and because it’s actually really good.  They are similar to gnocchi, using cheese and flour to make little dumplings.  But they are a bit more sloppy and lazy perhaps.  Pesto is also a bit of a lazy choice in my opinion, plus the basil you can get now!  Lazy noodles are often just served with browned butter breadcrumbs (so good!), little bacon bits or just sugar and butter.  But really they can be served with many other sauces, but just remember – keep it lazy!

Also I don’t do the whole pine nut pesto thing, in America pine nuts cost an arm and a leg, and I like my limbs thank you very much.  It’s walnuts for me.

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This version of lazy noodles I made is not the laziest.  The laziest would be to just take some farmer’s cheese and mix in an egg and then just add flour until you get the consistency you need.   I wanted mine to be extra good so I went for the slightly less lazy version where you beat egg whites and soften butter and all that jazz.

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Lazy Noodle (Kluski Leniwe) with Pesto

3 eggs separated

6 tbsp unsalted butter, softened

2 1/4 cup soft farmer’s cheese

pinch of salt

1 1/3 cup all purpose flour (plus more for shaping)

1 1/2 cups basil, washed and dried

1/3 cup walnuts

1/3 cup olive oil

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1 garlic clove

juice of half 1 lemon

salt and pepper

-fill a large pot with salted water and set to boil.

-make the pesto by mixing the basil, oil, walnuts, olive oil, cheese, garlic and lemon in a food processor.  don’t over blend it, just pulse until it’s all blended nicely into a paste/sauce type texture.  season and pulse a couple more times.  set aside until the noodles are done.

-beat the egg white until soft peaks form and set aside.  mix the egg yolks with the softened butter.   mix the farmer’s cheese with the yolks and butter and add salt.  gently fold in the egg whites.  fold in the flour in small batches and mix well.

-flour your work surface well.  the dough will be very sticky so use a bunch of flour and don’t overwork it.  divide the dough into four parts.  take one part and gently form it into a long snake shape (sorry, just makes the most sense to describe it like this!), use your fingers to pinch and form it then roll it back and forth the make it longer.  you can make it as thin as you want but not too extreme, then cut the snake into even pieces and place on a floured plate or cutting board.

-place them into the boiling water not all at once.  they will float to the surface when they are done, just a minute or two so keep checking.  place them in a strainer and when they are all done toss them in your pesto!

Violà -jrad

rhubarb tarragon spelt scones

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I am on the tail end of my moment with scones and just starting my next phase of tarragon.  So this is perfect, also because rhubarb – I love you.  Right before Spring started we finally watched Sherlock and then I finally watched The Great British Baking Show, so you could say I have British treats on my mind.  There were a couple of weeks where I was making scones on Sunday and then putting them in the freezer so that Monday morning I would just turn the oven on and pop in a scones or two and wait.  It was a great way to start the week.  It is starting to get hot, air conditioners have been put in the windows, so this might be my last scone Monday.  Sometimes I get the urge to not turn the oven all summer, but maybe we will get some cooler rainy days too because I don’t think I can last without an oven.

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So scones.  And now tarragon.  I saw a recipe for rhubarb tarragon sangria that I was intrigued by in The New Midwestern Table.  And then I saw this.  And was telling Gevork about it, who said he grew up drinking this in the Soviet Union.  So I spent Saturday night doing laundry and running errands and thinking about how I really wanted to make tarragon soda.  However, I was encouraged to try the real deal first, so who wants to go to Brighton Beach?  The tarragon was instead used to make these scones and I am very happy about it!

Tarragon has a licorice flavor by the way.  I think it tastes really nice with the tanginess of the rhubarb and the nuttiness of the spelt.

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Rhubarb Tarragon Spelt Scones

3 stalks of rhubarb, cut into 1 inch chunks

1/4 cup + 3 tbsp sugar

1 1/2 cup all purpose flour

1 cup spelt flour

1 tbsp baking powder

1/2 tsp salt

8 tbsp unsalted butter, cold and cut into small pieces

2 tbsp chopped tarragon

2/3 – 3/4 cup heavy cream

-toss the rhubarb in the 3 tbsp sugar.

-mix the flours with salt and baking powder.  mix the butter into the flour mixture and using a pastry cutter cut the butter until little pea size pieces form.  mix in 1/4 cup sugar and then the rhubarb and tarragon.  slowly add the cream, do 2/3 and add more as needed until you have a dough.  use your hands to combine but don’t knead too much, just until formed together.

-preheat your oven to 425 degrees if making now, or freeze and make later.

-divide the dough into two pieces and make a disc.  cut each disc into 4-6 triangles.  arrange the pieces on a baking tray lined with parchment paper.  bake about 20 minutes until starting to brown a bit.  you can also freeze them for a week or two, wrap them tight and then bake them frozen and watch the baking time.

-jrad

strawberry pierogi

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Hey!  Strawberries are in season, yes they are!  Did you know that you can make strawberry pierogi?  And you eat them with sweet sour cream and dream about the Eastern European countryside.

I can’t believe it’s June already.  I am trying to enjoy the loveliness of Spring as long as I can, but right now that consists of sitting outside when I have a break, watching the clouds and sometimes I even walk with a spring in my step when I wake up to the sunshine and go home with sunshine (sometimes even at 8pm!).  I joined a community garden nearby but have not visited it enough and missed two work days.  I really want to up my gardening skills but honestly I think having your own garden must be better.

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I think rolling and kneading pierogi dough might be may favorite thing ever.  It has a great texture.  It’s really soft and supple and quite elastic.  There a couple ways to fill pierogi with strawberries, but I think this is the best one.  A whole little strawberry tucked inside the lovely supple dough.  The other way would be to cut the strawberries into little pieces and shape them differently, more like a half moon.  But these are cuter, right!?

So here you go, try and and love them.

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Strawberry Pierogi

3 cups unbleached all purpose flour

1 large egg

2 tbsp oil

1 tsp salt

1/2 cup – 3/4 cup warm water

1 pound small strawberries, hulled and cut in half if not small

1 tbsp powdered sugar

sour cream and sugar for serving

-to make the dough pour the flour into a large bowl.  make a well in the center of the flour and crack the egg, pour the oil and sprinkle the salt.  mix a little with a fork and then slowly add the water, just 1/2 cup at first.  start to mix with your hands forming a dough.  add more water if too dry and flour if too wet.  flour your kneading surface well and knead the dough for 6-8 minutes until well incorporated and it looks like gluten has formed well.  keep adding flour as needed.  place the dough ball on a well floured surface and cover with the mixing bowl you used before, let rest for about an hour.

-meanwhile prepare your strawberries.  and set a big pot of salted water to boil.  prepare a cutting board with flour.

-once the dough has rested take half of it and roll it out on a well floured surface until just the right thickness, not too thick and not too thin, you’ll know when you start working.  use a wide thin cup to make circles, as close together as you can.  take out a circle and use the bottom side to fill.  place a strawberry, or half in the center.  using all fingers, pinch the circle around to cover the berry in a little cross and pinch tightly around all the openings.  they will look like cute little packages.  place on the floured cutting board, making sure they don’t touch each other.  you will put them in the freezer after doing a couple and keep adding.  they cook nicely if a little bit frozen.  repeat with the rest of the dough.

-they will cook fast, so use your time how you need depending on what space you have.  once they are ready plop them in the water, not more than 10 at a time.  stir them a bit to make sure they don’t stick.  when they float to the top they are ready, sometimes i let them sit at the top a bit longer to get a bit softer.

-they taste the best served right away.  mix some sour cream with sugar and enjoy!

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-julia rad(ish)

rhubarb rose upside down yogurt cake

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New Yorkers love to complain.  In the winter the slightest bit of snow makes everyone freak out and all the schools close. The summers, on the other hand, are too hot and everyone escapes to The Hamptons or Maine (I admit it sucks because there are too many tourists and it smells pretty bad).

Let me tell you what they are complaining about now.  Apparently spring doesn’t last long enough and they keep saying “where is spring?”.  The temperature is between 50-70 most days and we’ve been having a lot of rain. Now everyone likes a good Spring, but when did we (they) get this idea that Spring was a walk in the park?  The earth is literally regrowing itself!  Give it a break.

This morning I woke up to a grey sky again and a dampness in the air that felt like a rainforest and you know what?  It was so beautiful!  That is Spring!  Everyday there is something new, like little presents left out for us every morning, the tress have more leaves and the grass looks greener.  I’m a Spring baby and I embrace the rain and the mess, bring it.

(I do think that some of them mean that soon it will be like 100 degrees because of global warming and they feel Spring is shorter than it used to be.  But they’d probably complain anyway.  Enjoy it while you can!)

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I’ve been a little obsessed with the smells of flowers as of late.  I almost feel intoxicated by them sometimes.  Lilacs are just the best thing ever, they make me feel so good about life.

Rose water is also the bomb and is perfect for spring. I put some in my marinated beets this weekend and it was delightful.  It might not be everyone’s cup of tea but I can’t get enough.   I added some rose to this rhubarb cake that I made Tuesday as it was pouring rain outside.  A couple of weeks ago I got quite soaked walking from the train and when I got home it stopped raining, classic, so I made this cake because.  And oh my gosh almond flour cakes are so moist and I think I might even like the texture better than regular flour.  So this cake was my jam and I used that and just adapted a bit. 

Rhubarb is RAD!

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Rhubarb Rose Upside Down Yogurt Cake

5-6 stalks of rhubarb, cut into 2 inch pieces on an angle, and cut in half if really thick

4 tbsp honey

1/2 cup water

1 tsp rose water

2 cups almond flour

1/2 cup rice flour (white, brown or sweet)

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp salt

7 tbsp butter, room temperature

1/2 cup honey

1 cup yogurt

3 eggs separated

-heat the honey, water and rose water in a medium saucepan until the honey is dissolved.  add all the rhubarb, or in batches so they aren’t crowded.  cook the rhubarb until slightly soft but not mushy (I did mine too long, it happens quick so watch out!) and strain out.  put to the side.  cook down the liquid some more if you need  so you can use it as a syrup at the end.

-preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

-combine flours, baking powder and salt.  in separate bowl mix the butter with the honey (with a hand mixer or stand mixer).  add the egg yolks and mix well. mix the flour into the butter mixture.

-beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form.  gently fold in the egg whites and the yogurt and mix well.

-line a spring form pan with parchment paper all the way up the sides.  lay the rhubarb in a nice pattern, better than mine!  a circle is nice, red on the outside and green on the inside is also nice.  pour the cake batter on top.  bake for 50-55 minutes.  let it cool a bit before flipping and removing the spring form.  pour the rest of the rose honey syrup on top!

enjoy! (I had mine with some Early Grey tea, my other new, or renewed, obsession)

sorrel soup

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I just got back from a lovely couple of days in Chicago visiting my parents.  It wasn’t the Bahamas or Iceland but it felt so nice nonetheless.  Anytime we get away from our normal routine it is so refreshing.  I used to come visit and get very anxious to get back to my life in New York and would feel that Chicago was so boring and lame.  But I just welcome it so much now, cuz I’m pretty lame and Chicago is actually pretty cool.  I do love the mid-west, I know mountains and oceans are better but the midwest is special, there is something in the air that floats around and makes you feel ok about yourself.

We celebrated Easter and it was lovely.  Saturday we got our baskets blessed and I made a traditional Polish Easter dessert called mazurek, we died hard boiled eggs and had an array of sandwiches and babkas and cheesecake.  I think Easter is my favorite holiday and I never come to Chicago for it and I’m so glad I did this year.  We also went to the botanical garden and I got some glamour shots of how beautiful nature is!  I wish I was as beautiful as a flower!

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My mother’s garden is also starting to slowly show signs of life.  The nettle and sorrel are the strongest and when I saw the sorrel I got so excited to make sorrel soup!  I tried to make it last year in the summer and it is so hard to find sorrel!  I found some at the farmers market but it would be just small little bundles for a bit too much money for me and only for part of the season.  So I made this great soup yesterday.  It is simple farm food, sorrel is easily found in Europe and a popular ingredient for soup and sauces.  If you can find it here get it and enjoy it, or if you have a garden plant some!  It is a sturdy plant.

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Sorrel Soup

1 small onion, diced

4 garlic cloves, minced

2 tbsp butter

3-4 small potatoes, peeled and diced

6 cups vegetable broth

salt and pepper

1/2 pound or about 6 cups sorrel, chopped

1 cup sour cream

1 tbsp flour

hard boiled eggs, cut into 4ths

parsley or dill for garnish

-heat a stock pot to medium and add 1 tbsp butter.  add the onion and garlic until a bit soft.  add the potato with salt and pepper and cook about 1 minute.  add the broth and bring to a boil.  turn down heat and simmer until potatoes are almost cooked.

-meanwhile heat a skillet to medium and add 1 tbsp butter.  add the sorrel until wilted, it will turn a muddy green.  turn off heat and add the sorrel to the soup.  continue simmering.

– mix the sour cream with flour in a bowl and add about 1/4 cup of broth to the mixture slowly to blend.  add it back to the soup (this helps break the sour cream a bit so it’s not chunky).  simmer a bit, make sure potatoes are cooked.

-add pieces of hard boiled egg into the soup and top with herbs if desired.  season to taste.

-this can also be eaten cold!

-juliaradish

teff carrot cake

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April 12th sounds like a great day to eat carrot cake, right?

It also sounds like a great day to have a birthday, right?

Well I must be lucky because I get both of those today, a birthday and a carrot cake!  (It is also Beverly Cleary’s birthday-she is 100! love her).  And the weather in New York has been goooorrrgeous.  The only downfall is the streets are filled with a ridiculous amount of people again (where do they all come from!!?), but at least my neck of the woods stays pretty chill – except for that new music venue that opened up down the block and then rapper who moved into the old firehouse…..

I always think a birthday cake should be representative of the person whose birthday it is.  Also maybe where they are in their life?  Like when you were 10 and you would get a picture on the cake of your favorite hobby.  I guess as an adult it’s different (or not!) – and it’s more about flavor and texture.

I feel like a carrot cake right now.

I contemplated many versions of carrot cake but when I saw this one in Tartine All Day, as I was browsing cookbooks in a book store, I knew it was the one.  I loved that it used different flours (also teff flour is like a superhero flour) because I think it adds a lot more flavor.  I also liked her description of carrot cake being the birthday cake of choice for youngins in Switzerland and England, I thought how perfect for my 29th birthday, my last bit of childhood before I turn 30 next year.

So now that I have my cake it is time to think about one more year of twenties.  Even though forty is the new thirty I still feel like turning thirty is a big deal.  So…

a list of 29 before I turn thirty (in no particular order):

  1. have nice hair (as in don’t cut my own hair anymore and learn how to style it)
  2. make my bed every morning
  3. understand physics
  4. floss everyday
  5. learn how to use excel spreadsheets (or rather re-learn)
  6. have a better music collection (help!)
  7. pray and meditate everyday
  8. keep in touch with people better
  9. make a perfect poached egg
  10. know the difference between whisky, scotch, bourbon and rye and while we are at it maybe red wine too – know more about red wine?
  11. memorize important phone numbers
  12. have better phone skills and probably overall better communication skills
  13. save for retirement (wow I can’t believe I just wrote that)
  14. master the sewing machine
  15. finish things that I start
  16. do more cardio
  17. figure out what I am doing with my life (AKA-somehow get parents to worry less about me)
  18. wear silk scarves around neck
  19. acquire and use airline miles
  20. read the news more
  21. know more in general
  22. get over fear of driving on the highway
  23. document life better
  24. know how to cook amazing things by heart
  25. be less serious because this list is stressing me out and a woman in my Pilates class called me out on being too serious, but I think she meant it in a good way…
  26. spell better (is it too late for that?)
  27. be stronger
  28. be wiser
  29. be kinder

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Confession.  I don’t remember the last time I made a layer cake, I am more of a pie, tort and flaky stuff kind-of girl.  This is a layer cake.  So I did my best, and hope to get better.  It tastes freakin awesome though!  Also I got a kitchen-aid for my birthday!!!

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It worked like a charm, I love it so much.  I feel a lot spoiled and a little bit more like an adult.

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recipe adapted from here

Teff Carrot Cake

cake:

1 cup sugar

1 cup coconut sugar (or more sugar but coconut tastes good if you can swing it)

3 large eggs

1/2 cup applesauce

1 ld carrots, peeled and grated

1 cup warmed coconut oil, so it is liquid

juice of 1 lemon

1 1/4 cup teff flour

1/2 cup rice flour (sweet is probably best but I think mine was just brown)

1/2 cup oat flour

2 tsp cinnamon

grated nutmeg or 1/4 tsp ground

1/8 tsp ground cardamom

2 tsp baking soda

3/4 tsp salt

salt

1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut

1 cup toasted and chopped pecans (or walnuts but we like pecans better and it was good)

frosting:

8 oz cream cheese, room temperature

6 tbsp butter, room temperature

3 cups confectioners sugar

juice 1 lemon

-pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees. butter two 9-inch cake pans and put a circle of parchment paper in the bottom.  you can also just use one cake pan and do two rounds.

-beat the eggs and sugar with a hand mixer or a stand mixer until thick and light in color, a couple of minutes.  you want a ribbon of egg when you take the whisk out.  add the applesauce, carrots, coconut oil and lemon and mix well.

-in a separate bowl mix the flours, spices, baking soda and salt.  add the flour to the egg mixture with a wooden spoon or spatula.  fold in the coconut and pecans.

-pour half into each cake pan (or save half for next round).  bake about 35-40 minutes.  let the cakes cool about 10 minutes and then invert onto wire racks or plates.  let them cool completely before frosting.

-for frosting, mix butter and cream cheese first in a stand mixer or a hand mixer until well combined and then add confectioner’s sugar and lemon and mix until smooth.  spread frosting on one cake then place the other on top and spread all over.

-enjoy!

honey roasted radishes with polenta and bacon

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My first blog post!  Do people still make blogs…

I had one about 6 years ago (basically forever ago) and abandoned it when I moved to New York.  I wish I had kept it though because I am pretty sure I am more boring now and blogs were still cool then.  I started it after reading Alicia Silverstone’s book The Kind Diet and watching Food Inc. – it was the vegan phase of my life.  It was pretty basic and I didn’t tell people about it, but it was ok because I was younger and it didn’t matter.  Now that I am older, there is pressure to not be silly and stupid and try new things.  But being older also means you don’t care as much and you do things for yourself.  So here’s to me!

I start with the radish as a radish should.  And on a Sunday.  Well this was made on a Saturday actually.  It was a lovely Spring day and people were outside!  The farmer’s market had more tourists and gawkers, but no radishes yet.  There were also people running in the streets and after drinking coffee for the first time in 2 months I climbed out of my shell and went running too.  The last time I went running it was the end of fall and I was really sore after and I’m pretty sure I got laryngitis from it.  Yesterday I wore two unnecessary layers of pants and I had to take one pair off and hide them behind a pole and keep checking they were still there every time I ran around the track.  And I was that weirdo doing GYROKINESIS® on the side, hiiiiiii!

So radishes.

I grew up eating radishes with just salt.  After my mother would chop off the ends, I would sprinkle some salt (to cut the spiciness) and then take a bite and then take another bite and repeat.  A whole bowl would be eaten in this manner.  The second way was on bread with cream cheese, just thin slices.  I later realized butter was the more sophisticated (French) way and now I do that as well, but cream cheese is still pretty rad.

Then there is the roasted radish.  I really didn’t like the thought of it at first, I like my radishes with a crunch and a spiciness.  When you roast them they become something completely different.  But I like them this way a lot.  I like them with honey and bacon and polenta.  Yes it was very good.

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Roasted Radishes with Polenta and Bacon

4 cups water

1 cup polenta (or cornmeal – not instant)

1 tsp salt

1 tbsp unsalted butter

2 bunches radishes with greens

2 tbsp honey

1 tbsp olive oil

salt and pepper to taste

half of 1 lemon

6 slices thick bacon

-boil the water with salt in a medium pot.  slowly pour in the polenta as you stir with a whisk.  keep stirring for a couple minutes.  turn the heat to low and cover the pot.  stir every 10 minutes for about a minute.  do this for about 45 minutes until creamy, then add the butter.  keep it covered if not using right away about 20 minutes, after that it will solidify and not be as creamy!

-meanwhile preheat the oven to 425 degrees and clean the radishes and greens and let them dry a bit.  chop off the greens and save them.  cut the radishes in half or in quarters if they are big.  toss the radishes with the honey and oil and season with salt and pepper.  pour into a baking dish and squeeze lemon juice on top.  roast for about 15 minutes, until radishes are softened and starting to brown.  season with more salt and pepper if need.

-heat a medium skillet and add the bacon, cook until crispy, about 10 minutes.  remove the bacon and some of the grease if there is too much and add the radish top greens until softened.

-serve polenta with the greens, bacon and radishes on top.

-julia radish